Its time for the Elite Eight in March Moniker Madness

A couple of 1-seeds finally fell in the regional semis in the Madness, with Johnny Dickshot finally petering out in the Sounds Dirty bracket, and Kila Ka’aihue’s Spelling Bee charge to the title getting lost in translation.  Only two regions had their top two seeds make the regional finals, and the “Spelling Bee” regional final is a 4 vs. 7-seed battle.

The updated bracket is shown in this pdf.  We’ll now list all 4 “elite eight” match-ups here, and would love for you to vote on all of them by late Thursday afternoon.  Once again, the number to the far, far left of the name is the seed in the region.  The number and letters to the immediate left of the name are for clerical purposes only. (ex. “6  SD-121 Tony Suck” would mean Tony Suck is the 6 seed in the “Sounds Dirty” region)

Now, onto the pairings!

“Sounds Dirty” Regional Final

  • 4 SD-113 Rusty Kuntz (79%, 33 Votes)
  • 3 SD-21 Cannonball Titcomb (21%, 9 Votes)

Total Voters: 42

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“Fun to Say” Regional Final

  • 1 FTS-94 Pickles Dillhoefer (71%, 30 Votes)
  • 2 FTS-116 Tim Spooneybarger (29%, 12 Votes)

Total Voters: 42

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“Spelling Bee” Regional Final

  • 7 SB-89 Marc Rzepczynski (60%, 25 Votes)
  • 4 SB-100 Ossee Schrecongost (40%, 17 Votes)

Total Voters: 42

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“What Were Mom and Dad Thinking?” Regional Final

  • 2 MD-9 Astyanax Douglass (67%, 28 Votes)
  • 1 MD-47 Drungo Hazewood (33%, 14 Votes)

Total Voters: 42

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8 thoughts on “Its time for the Elite Eight in March Moniker Madness

    • Same problem here. Went with Astyanax for the ancient Trojan reference.

      I don’t think anyone’s beating Pickles Dillhoefer, though.

        • A little research…U.S. Census records from 1910 and 1920 list a family with the surname Drungo living in Mobile, Alabama at those times.

          Drungo Hazewood was born in Mobile in 1959. One Drungo still lived in the area as late as the 1930 census, late enough that Mr. Hazewood’s parents might have known him and named their child after him. That is my current hypothesis.

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