Canonical Record of Batting Lines – 1918-2011 (Part 3 – The Two ABs)

We’re up to the “two at-bats” listing in the journey through every starter’s AB-R-H-RBI batting line from 1918-2011.

We should just call this group the “Barry Bonds,” as he claims sole possession of five unique batting lines.

1918-2011 STARTERS’ GAME LINES – Two ABs
AB R H RBI COUNT LEADER(S) TIMES
2 0 0 0 44126 Barry Bonds 71
2 0 0 1 6599 Eddie Murray 15
2 0 0 2 420 6 tied 3
2 0 0 3 10 10 tied 1
2 0 1 0 13990 Barry Bonds 26
2 0 1 1 5090 Ted Simmons 13
2 0 1 2 1198 5 tied 5
2 0 1 3 159 Roy Smalley, Vada Pinson, Willie Kamm 2
2 0 1 4 12 12 tied 1
2 0 2 0 1192 5 tied 5
2 0 2 1 663 Jim Hegan, Frank Thomas 4
2 0 2 2 229 Muddy Ruel, Lance Berkman 2
2 0 2 3 47 47 tied 1
2 0 2 4 6 6 tied 1
2 1 0 0 15637 Eddie Yost 43
2 1 0 1 1862 Tony Phillips 8
2 1 0 2 89 Hector Torres 2
2 1 0 3 2 Richie Hebner, Mike Hargrove 1
2 1 1 0 9835 Barry Bonds 29
2 1 1 1 5072 Frank Thomas 19
2 1 1 2 1771 Boog Powell 11
2 1 1 3 494 Babe Ruth 6
2 1 1 4 83 Charlie Keller 2
2 1 1 5 15 Ken Williams 2
2 1 2 0 1253 Enos Slaughter 6
2 1 2 1 960 Carlton Fisk 5
2 1 2 2 432 Hank Thompson, Babe Ruth, Reggie Jackson, Hank Greenberg 4
2 1 2 3 168 5 tied 2
2 1 2 4 31 31 tied 1
2 1 2 5 7 7 tied 1
2 1 2 6 1 Chris Gomez 1
2 2 0 0 2252 Ted Williams, Babe Ruth 11
2 2 0 1 217 Harlond Clift 4
2 2 0 2 13 13 tied 1
2 2 0 3 1 Tommy Griffith 1
2 2 1 0 2752 Jeff Bagwell 11
2 2 1 1 1667 Mickey Mantle, Barry Bonds 9
2 2 1 2 627 Babe Ruth 5
2 2 1 3 215 Lou Gehrig 4
2 2 1 4 36 36 tied 1
2 2 1 5 5 5 tied 1
2 2 2 0 519 Eddie Yost 4
2 2 2 1 498 Frank Thomas, Mickey Mantle 5
2 2 2 2 316 Sammy Sosa, Barry Bonds 3
2 2 2 3 140 Barry Bonds 6
2 2 2 4 56 Albert Pujols, Mike Lieberthal 2
2 2 2 5 16 16 tied 1
2 2 2 6 1 Arndt Jorgens 1
2 3 0 0 155 10 tied 2
2 3 0 1 10 10 tied 1
2 3 0 2 1 Mickey Tettleton 1
2 3 1 0 391 5 tied 3
2 3 1 1 246 6 tied 3
2 3 1 2 101 Gary Sheffield 3
2 3 1 3 29 Ryan Howard 2
2 3 1 4 2 Warren Newson, Bobby Murcer 1
2 3 2 0 115 Fernando Vina, Wade Boggs, Lance Berkman 2
2 3 2 1 139 Mel Ott, Ted Williams 3
2 3 2 2 96 Jim Thome, Tim Salmon, Sal Bando 2
2 3 2 3 38 38 tied 1
2 3 2 4 13 13 tied 1
2 3 2 5 4 Casey Kotchman, Jim Edmonds, Carlos Delgado, Jim Adcock 1
2 4 0 0 4 Jim Thome, Andy Pafko, Ken Henderson, Bernie Friberg 1
2 4 0 2 1 Frank O’Rourke 1
2 4 1 0 26 26 tied 1
2 4 1 1 21 21 tied 1
2 4 1 2 4 Ken Williams, Dwayne Murphy, Hersh Martin, Charlie Gehringer 1
2 4 1 3 1 Rob Deer 1
2 4 1 4 1 Mickey Tettleton 1
2 4 2 0 19 19 tied 1
2 4 2 1 24 24 tied 1
2 4 2 2 9 9 tied 1
2 4 2 3 8 8 tied 1
2 4 2 4 1 Wes Covington 1
2 4 2 5 3 Gary Roenicke, Ken Phelps, Hank Greenberg 1
2 5 0 0 1 Joe Morgan 1
2 5 1 0 1 Woody English 1
2 5 1 2 1 Barry Bonds 1
2 5 1 5 1 Roy Cullenbine 1
2 5 2 0 3 Don Mattingly, Darren Lewis, Solly Hemus 1
2 5 2 1 2 Tim Raines, Johnny Mostil 1
2 6 2 1 1 Mel Ott 1

Previously in this series:

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail
twitterrss
This entry was posted in Play Index mining, stat crunching and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Canonical Record of Batting Lines – 1918-2011 (Part 3 – The Two ABs)

  1. Cliff says:

    What are the other four unique lines for Barry Bonds with 2 at bats? Only one is shown in the article.

  2. Chad says:

    You know, I didn’t notice it when this was first posted, but after looking again at rare batting lines in the more recent article, I can’t figure out how Griffith’s 2-2-0-3 (from an era where play-by-play data is unavailable) worked out. I mean, I can understand theoretically how such a line could play out, but in that particular game, his team scored just 6 total runs, and only scored in three innings. Barring Griffith somehow managing to get credited with two RBIs on a play in which he did not record a hit, he would’ve had to have driven in a run in all three of the innings in which his team scored and managed to score in two of them. He worked a pair of walks in his other plate appearances, but his team never scored more than 3 runs in an inning, and the only time they did that was in the first inning, when he couldn’t have possibly worked a bases loaded walk because he was the third batter. I guess it’s possible that in the inning that they scored two runs, he drove in the first with a bases-loaded walk with no outs and the two runners in front of him were gunned down, allowing him to score the other one with two outs, but… that still leaves him needing to get two others. There is an error for the opposing team. I’m guessing that the other walk is a red herring, and that in that 3-run first, he reached on said error on a play that would’ve scored one run regardless (perhaps it was first-and-third, no outs…the error was committed by the second baseman. And then he scored the third run, and he drove in the lone run in the other inning with an out. But it’s a very strange line.

Leave a Reply